Thank you for supporting YOUR public lands!

New Mexico Public Lands Information Center

Want to explore New Mexico's public lands?

Chat with us! Monday to Friday, 8am to 430pm, Mountain Time.

We're ready to answer your questions about access, activities, and
which public lands are open in New Mexico, including: BLM sites,
Forest Service sites, state parks, county open space, and more!

Click the chat link or call us at (505) 954-2003.

We are open and ready to help, Monday - Friday, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm MT.

Click here for a list of frequently asked questions.
Since 1997, the New Mexico Public Lands Information Center has been a one-stop source to provide information about recreational opportunities and facilities on New Mexico public lands. We explain rules and regulations, public lands access, recreation opportunities and we can help connect you with brochures as well as guidebooks and maps for sale. We work closely with federal, state and local agencies to deliver verified information to help you plan your next public lands adventure!

Resources

Adventure Safely!

Our public lands belong to all of us. Get out and explore! But first a few ground rules and tips for staying safe: Most of the public land in New Mexico is remote country. It is accessible from unimproved; sometimes four wheel drive, roads and tracks. Be prepared to be self-sufficient with water,...
Read more...

New Mexico BLM Public Lands Access Map

Click numbered area on map below or select from drop down list for a section map.
New Mexico BLM Dispersed Camping Area 1 New Mexico BLM Dispersed Camping Area 2 New Mexico BLM Dispersed Camping Area 3 New Mexico BLM Dispersed Camping Area 4 New Mexico BLM Dispersed Camping Area 5 New Mexico BLM Dispersed Camping Area 6 New Mexico BLM Dispersed Camping Area 7 New Mexico BLM Dispersed Camping Area 8

Frequently Asked Questions

Information reviewed daily and updated as federal, agency, and state authorities announce decisions regarding public land access.


New Mexico State Parks

Campfires are prohibited everywhere in New Mexico (pressurized gas stoves are ok), indefinitely. Fireworks are not allowed on any public lands, ever.

As of 15 May 2020, the following New Mexico State Parks have reopened for day use. The remaining NM State Parks are closed until further notice. Learn more.
Brantley Lake
Caballo Lake
Cerrillos Hills
Cimarron Canyon
City of Rocks
Clayton Lake and Dinosaur Trackways
Coyote Creek
Living Desert Zoo and Gardens
Mesilla Valley Bosque
Oasis
Oliver Lee
Pancho Villa
Rockhound
Storrie Lake
Sumner Lake
Ute Lake
Villanueva


BLM Lands:

Campfires are prohibited everywhere in New Mexico (pressurized gas stoves are ok), indefinitely. Fireworks are not allowed on any public lands, ever.

Click here for BLM closures.


Forest Service Lands:

Campfires are prohibited everywhere in New Mexico (pressurized gas stoves are ok), indefinitely. Fireworks are not allowed on any public lands, ever.

Carson National Forest:
Recreation opportunities available, include hiking and biking on trails, dispersed camping, and other activities that support social distancing and small group sizes (less than 5 people). Currently, most developed recreation sites on the forest are closed due to seasonal closures or to protect public health by limiting the number of people at a site. Some recreational sites may be accessible, but the facilities are not open (restrooms) or do not have service (trash). Learn More.

Cibola National Forest and Grasslands
Limited amenities and closed restrooms. Hiking, dispersed camping, and other dispersed recreation uses are available.Learn More.
The Cibola NF has closed the recreation facilities on the Mt Taylor RD, to the west of ABQ. Dispersed camping is ok.

Gila National Forest
Developed campgrounds and restroom facilities are closed. Recreation opportunities available. Learn more.

Lincoln National Forest
Many campgrounds, restrooms, picnic areas, and day-use areas are closed. Trails are still open. Dispersed camping and other activities that support social distancing and small groups are still permitted. Learn more.

Santa Fe National Forest
Although some facilities, such as developed recreation sites and restroom facilities are closed. The majority of the forest is still open to visitors who want to spend time outdoors. Most trailheads are open now or will be when the snow melts, including those that originate on or near developed campgrounds. Dispersed camping outside developed sites is still an option, and most fishing accesses are still accessible. Learn More.

A few developed camping areas in New Mexico are open. This list will be updated continuously.

BLM: https://www.blm.gov/alert/nm-covid-19-updates

Angel Peak Scenic Area, southeast of Bloomfield
Rob Jaggers (water and hookups) and Cave Campgrounds, near Ruidoso and Ft Stanton
Haystack Mountain and Mescalero Sands Campgrounds, east of Roswell

Cibola National Forest: https://www.fs.usda.gov/cibola

Fourth of July and Red Canyon (upper) Campgrounds, north of Mountainair
Bear Trap, Hughes Mill, Luna Park, Springtime, and Water Canyon Campgrounds, south of Magdalena

All BLM and Forest Service lands are open for dispersed, backcountry camping and hiking. Here are some of the primitive, dispersed areas on public lands we recommend right now. We're sorry, but it's impossible to be specific because of daily weather changes, temporary unimproved road conditions, overcrowding, and social distancing requirements.

Maps of New Mexico public lands access can be found here.

Here are some of the primitive, dispersed areas on public lands we recommend right now. It is impossible to be specific. Expect daily weather changes, temporary unimproved road conditions, crowding, and social distancing requirements.

Mountains:
Forest Service lands between US 84, US285, and NM554, north to the Colorado state line, in northern NM
Forest Service units of the Cibola NF, west and southwest of Socorro
Anywhere in the Lincoln and Gila NF

High desert:
BLM lands in the Rio Grande del Norte Nat Mon. (Taos Plateau and Ute Mtn)
BLM lands east of Socorro, north of US380
BLM lands around Quemado, off US60.

Low desert:
BLM lands north of Lordsburg, and I10.
BLM lands east and west of I25, near Truth or Consequences, NM
BLM lands to the east & west of the Lincoln NF Guadalupe District, near Carlsbad, NM
BLM lands around US285, between Corona and Jal

The following New Mexico fishing lakes are open for day use:

North Central New Mexico

Abiquiu Lake, no motorized boats.

Storrie Lake State Park

Northeast New Mexico

Charette Lakes, East of Mora

Clayton Lake State Park

Sumner Lake State Park

Ute Lake State Park

Southwest New Mexico

Glenwood Hatchery Pond
Lake Roberts, North of Silver City
Quemado Lake, South of Quemado
Snow Lake, East of Mogollon
Tree's Pond, Deming

South Central New Mexico

Elephant Butte Reservoir, spillway only, no boats

Caballo Lake State Park

Southeast New Mexico

Lake Dexter, south of Roswell

Brantley Lake State Park


All streams, canals, and rivers on, and accessible from public lands are open for day fishing.

To see what’s biting, the NM Dept of Game and Fish posts weekly fishing and stocking reports.

BLM and Forest Service lands are open to these activities without a special permit. You may collect reasonable amounts of mineral specimens, rocks, semi-precious gems, petrified wood, and invertebrate fossils.

Check out BLM's Rockhounding page for more information.

It is illegal to collect anything over 100 years old or to collect Native American artifacts. Take pictures and leave those where you found them.

Hiking Trails near Albuquerque

The Sandia Mountain trails are open to small groups who practice social distancing while on the trails.

The La Luz, Embudo, Embudito, Bear Canyon, and Foothill Trails, on the west face of the Sandias are great trails but can be steep, rocky, and very hot as the weather warms. The east side is gentler, cooler in the summer, and offers cross country and snowshoeing opportunities in the winter.

The Bosque Trail along the Rio Grande is the best riparian walking and cycling trail in the area. It is a very low impact trail. Check out 60 Hikes within 60 Miles of ABQ for more recommendations.


Hiking Trails near Santa Fe

Santa Fe is a hiker’s paradise. Many trails are just a few minutes from the downtown Plaza. There are day use trails from 7000 ft elevation to 12,000 foot elevation near Santa Fe.

The Borrego-Bear Wallow Loop and Circle Trails are good for a quick walk off Hyde Park Road which dead ends at the Santa Fe Ski Area.

The Lake Katherine and Nambe Lake Trails are the best day hikes in an alpine environment but are not recommended in the winter.

Santa Fe also has a network of trails in town. The Dale Ball Trails close to town and the Glorieta Basin Preserve south of town have horseback riding and mountain biking opportunities, as well as hiking.

Multi-day hikes include the Winsor and Skyline Trails into the Pecos Wilderness.